Vital drugs are either not authorized or are deemed too expensive, as cases rise.

Rates of tuberculosis are on the rise in Europe, but countries are ill-equipped and lack access to the latest drugs targeting the worst strains.

Some patients are spending a year and a half in hospital isolation receiving old medicines instead of just six months of treatment at home, because countries do not have access to the most up-to-date therapies to cure people of the infectious disease.

In some EU countries, the latest medicines are either not authorized or are deemed too expensive to use. To effectively treat patients, the NGO Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières, MSF) has stepped in to help in Poland and Slovakia.

Earlier this year, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (EDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that Europe was stalling in its quest to suppress tuberculosis and could miss its 2030 targets to end the disease. The agencies caution that if Europe doesn’t get a grip on the rising rates of infection with the recommended cocktail of drugs, the gains made over the last decade could be lost.

    • floofloof@lemmy.ca
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      26 days ago

      Some patients are spending a year and a half in hospital isolation receiving old medicines instead of just six months of treatment at home, because countries do not have access to the most up-to-date therapies to cure people of the infectious disease.

      If it’s a question of cost, then keeping someone in hospital for a year and a half surely has to be more expensive than just buying the drugs.

    • jwt@programming.dev
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      25 days ago

      Surely they can’t both be true at the same time though, right? Either governments are rightfully not participating in a price-gouging racket, or they are cheapskates not willing to pay pharma companies.

    • romp_2_door@lemmy.world
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      25 days ago

      I want you see you develop any of these life saving drugs. How much would education cost? How much would a lab and resources cost?

      If a publicly funded lab invents these cures then yes it should be open to the public

      But if a private company does it, it belongs ti the private company.

      Unless you don’t believe in private ownership?

      • Killing_Spark@feddit.de
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        25 days ago

        But if a private company does it, it belongs ti the private company.

        Unless you don’t believe in private ownership?

        “If I invented the means of saving lives that doesn’t make it my responsibility to actually do so. Especially if there are profits on the line”. Wow.

        Germany has a beautiful sentence in its constitution:

        Eigentum verpflichtet. Sein Gebrauch soll zugleich dem Wohle der Allgemeinheit dienen.

        Property implies responsibility. Its use shall also benefit the wellbeing of the general public.

        The thought being that while private property is a core staple of our society this is only the case because the concept of private property is seen as beneficial overall. If private property starts hurting the general public then the implied responsibilities coming with the property are not being fulfilled and the concept loses its value to society as a whole.

        • romp_2_door@lemmy.world
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          21 days ago

          restricting access to a cure is does not equal hurting.

          By that logic, not inventing a cure, when you could otherwise do so, is also hurting. So companies developing chronic medicines instead of cures would be actively engaging in hurt

          which does not make sense

          • Killing_Spark@feddit.de
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            21 days ago

            No that’s not the same. In one case there is only the theoretical possibility of help whereas in the other case there is a realizable possibility for help. This is a big difference.

    • romp_2_door@lemmy.world
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      25 days ago

      or to put it in other terms

      there are people literally dying in Africa right now because of hunger. You could spend money and ship food to them to save their life but you don’t. Is it because you’re a cheapstake who doesn’t care for human life?

  • Hugh_Jeggs@lemm.ee
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    25 days ago

    Why is it every article I see from Politico dot EU is extremely negative about Europe?

    Anyone know where this stuff comes from? It’s posted a lot

  • AutoTL;DR@lemmings.worldB
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    26 days ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    Some patients are spending a year and a half in hospital isolation receiving old medicines instead of just six months of treatment at home, because countries do not have access to the most up-to-date therapies to cure people of the infectious disease.

    The agencies caution that if Europe doesn’t get a grip on the rising rates of infection with the recommended cocktail of drugs, the gains made over the last decade could be lost.

    In a study carried out in October 2023, of 18 EU/EEA countries that responded to a survey, 15 reported limited or no availability of pretomanid, one of the drugs that makes up the WHO’s best-practice regimen.

    Manufacturers have chosen not to register some products with the European Medicines Agency or national authorities due to the relatively small market for TB drugs in Europe, according to researchers from The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.

    Although Europe has made progress in driving down overall rates of TB, the disease is not the priority it once was and European health systems are ill-placed to respond to the emergence of resistant strains.

    Dumitru Laticevschi, regional manager for Eastern Europe and Central Asia at the Global Fund, told POLITICO that multidrug-resistant TB has become a “very significant problem” for some EU countries since 2022.


    The original article contains 1,017 words, the summary contains 215 words. Saved 79%. I’m a bot and I’m open source!